(for Newsletter Archives, click here)

THE DYSLEXIA SOLUTION

#87 • November 2009

NEWSLETTER

You know the old saw about the tourist in New York City who stopped the cop on the corner and asked how to get to Carnegie Hall.  “Well,” said the cop, “there are three ways to get there:  practice, practice and practice.” Which is why teaching a dyslectic student to read is akin to getting to Carnegie Hall.  He has to practice, practice, and practice. And that’s why this kind of tutoring differs from teaching in school. There are no percentage marks.  No grades. Either you can read a certain word or you can’t. It is not optional.  70% is not enough. You have to get all the words right on a spelling exercise and you keep on doing the whole thing until you succeed. (For the other reason for redoing the entire spelling exercise, see Newsletter #76.)

Maybe this is why I have found that a music teacher who is an excellent reader and speller is apt to make a fabulous tutor for reading.  She is used to repeating something difficult until you get it right.  She knows that getting 70% of the notes right in a piece doesn’t produce music.  And she knows that small errors can make a world of difference in the outcome. It is the perfect mind set.

Here is one of my favorite examples. Dyslectic students, not being fussy about the little words, are apt to substitute “a” for “the” and wonder why you are being so persnickety when you insist on the right one. Here is my favorite example: 

Here is a sentence that means that your friend is the kind of person you can count on:

She was a responsible person.

Now all I have to do is change one word and suddenly she is the unlucky soul  who will catch it if things don’t go right:

She was the responsible person.

Or how about this: Here is a sentence that means that so many kids turned out for the Little League tryouts that they didn’t know what to do:
           
The number of players became unmanageable.
 
Now here is the same thing with one word changed that means that you were probably watching an English soccer game.

A number of players became unmanageable.

So it is practice, practice and practice, and only a perfect answer will do.  There is another reason I hate percentages and grades.  A mark of 70% may be passing and enable you to go to the next grade, but it is insulting and implies that you are only three quarters as good as the next kid who got 98. There is no human being on earth who is qualified to categorize a person’s value in this world.  Grading kids in school is no better than grading cattle for the market.  So there!


Would you like to receive these newsletters via email on a monthly basis? If so, enter your email address here:


Subscribe Unsubscribe



Archives :

February 2009 July / August 2009
March 2009 September 2009
April 2009 October 2009
May 2009 November 2009
June 2009 December 2009
   
Janurary 2008 June 2008
February 2008 July / August 2008
March 2008 September / October 2008
April 2008 November 2008
May 2008 December 2008
   
February 2007 September 2007
March 2007 October 2007
May 2007 November 2007
June 2007  
July / August 2007  
   
December 2006 June 2006
November 2006 May 2006
October 2006 April 2006
September 2006 March 2006
August 2006 February 2006
July 2006 January 2006
   
December 2005 May 2005
October 2005 April 2005
September 2005 March 2005
July/August 2005 February 2005
June 2005 January 2005
   
December 2004 - Vol. 3, #13 March 2003 - Vol. 2 #7
November 2004 - Vol. 3, #12 January 2003 - Vol. 2, #5
October 2004 - Vol. 3, #11 December 2002 - Vol. 2, #4
September 2004 - Vol. 3, #10 November 2002 - Vol. 2, #3
July/August 2004 - Vol. 3, #9 October 2002 - Vol. 2, #2
June 2004 - Vol 3. #8 September 2002 - Vol. 2, #1
April 2004 - Vol. 3 #6 August 2002 - Vol. 1, #11
March 2004 - Vol. 3 #5 July 2002 - Vol. 1, #10
February 2004 - Vol. 3, #4 May 2002 - Vol. 1, #9
December 2003 - Vol. 3, #3 March 2002 - Vol. 1, #8
October/November 2003 - Vol. 3, #2 February 2002 - Vol. 1, #7
September 2003 - Vol. 3, #1 January 2002 - Vol. 1, #6
August 2003 - Vol 2, # 12 December 2001 - Vol. 1, #5
July 2003 - Vol. 2, #11 November 2001 - Vol. 1, #4
June 2003 - Vol. 2, #10 October 2001 - Vol. 1, #3
May 2003 - Vol. 2, #9 September 2001 - Vol. 1, #2
April 2003 - Vol. 2, #8 August 2001 - Vol. 1, #1

 

 

All contents of this website © Reading From Scratch - All rights reserved

Web site created and maintained by The Design Dept.