(for Newsletter Archives, click here)

THE DYSLEXIA SOLUTION

#85 • September 2009

NEWSLETTER

A tutor has it all over a classroom teacher when  school starts.  The classroom teacher won’t know what her year will be like until she sees what kind of class she has.  Some classes are wonderful.  Some are-- well, not wonderful.  A tutor who is starting the Reading from Scratch program has a student who will have fun at his first lesson, not have to read anything yet (whew!),  understand that he is intelligent with or without reading skill and won’t mind coming back. After a few lessons, he finds out that he can read and spell something like “hubcap” which he has never even seen before, and you’ve got him! No quizzes, no MCAS, no wrong answers in front of his buddies. What a deal! It’s no wonder that tutoring is fun, especially if you have a program that gives quick success for which improvement is palpable and your parents are thrilled.

And that’s how it has been for me most of the time.

But then there was the year I had a 14 year old of the other kind.  He was a doozy.  His stock answer to any request was “I don’ wanna.” When I pointed to a word he was to pronounce and he didn’ wanna, I had to just sit and wait until he gave up and read the word.  He must have wasted half his tutoring time. Somehow he made enough progress to be reluctantly accepted at the trade school he wanted to get into.  At that point I declared him cured and thankfully quit.

I might have thought his problem was just reading, but apparently that was not so.  He was a computer whiz, so I was stunned when he told me he was failing his computer class at school!  (He probably could have taught it.) One of their assignments was  to design a website, and he didn’ wanna. So he didn’ and he failed the course! Oddly enough, he could be as nice as pie if it was the other way around and you wanted him to help you.  I remember one day when my dryer wouldn’t turn on and he took me downstairs to the fuse box, chose the right one, yanked it out and put it firmly back in, solving the problem.  If I asked for a favor, he was Johnny on the Spot.

This kid is a poster child for the hysterical parents who are scared to let their kids hear the President of the United States ask them to do something. President Obama may have gotten it right when he chose the children and not their parents to ask for help. It seems reasonably sensible to encourage children to grow up well educated. Somehow I doubt that he was trying to talk today’s third graders  into voting democratic 18 years from now.

In any case, now that it is September, my fervent wish for all you school teachers out there is that all your students wanna. but he could be as nice as pie when he did wanna. Once, when he came for his lesson I was complaining that my dryer wouldn’t turn on. Did I have a fuse box? Yes. We went into the cellar, he looked at the fuses, chose the right one, pulled it out and pushed it back in hard, and eurka, the dryer went on.


Would you like to receive these newsletters via email on a monthly basis? If so, enter your email address here:


Subscribe Unsubscribe



Archives :

Janurary 2009 June 2009
February 2009 July / August 2009
March 2009 September / October 2009
April 2009 November 2009
May 2009 December 2009
   
Janurary 2008 June 2008
February 2008 July / August 2008
March 2008 September / October 2008
April 2008 November 2008
May 2008 December 2008
   
February 2007 September 2007
March 2007 October 2007
May 2007 November 2007
June 2007  
July / August 2007  
   
December 2006 June 2006
November 2006 May 2006
October 2006 April 2006
September 2006 March 2006
August 2006 February 2006
July 2006 January 2006
   
December 2005 May 2005
October 2005 April 2005
September 2005 March 2005
July/August 2005 February 2005
June 2005 January 2005
   
December 2004 - Vol. 3, #13 March 2003 - Vol. 2 #7
November 2004 - Vol. 3, #12 January 2003 - Vol. 2, #5
October 2004 - Vol. 3, #11 December 2002 - Vol. 2, #4
September 2004 - Vol. 3, #10 November 2002 - Vol. 2, #3
July/August 2004 - Vol. 3, #9 October 2002 - Vol. 2, #2
June 2004 - Vol 3. #8 September 2002 - Vol. 2, #1
April 2004 - Vol. 3 #6 August 2002 - Vol. 1, #11
March 2004 - Vol. 3 #5 July 2002 - Vol. 1, #10
February 2004 - Vol. 3, #4 May 2002 - Vol. 1, #9
December 2003 - Vol. 3, #3 March 2002 - Vol. 1, #8
October/November 2003 - Vol. 3, #2 February 2002 - Vol. 1, #7
September 2003 - Vol. 3, #1 January 2002 - Vol. 1, #6
August 2003 - Vol 2, # 12 December 2001 - Vol. 1, #5
July 2003 - Vol. 2, #11 November 2001 - Vol. 1, #4
June 2003 - Vol. 2, #10 October 2001 - Vol. 1, #3
May 2003 - Vol. 2, #9 September 2001 - Vol. 1, #2
April 2003 - Vol. 2, #8 August 2001 - Vol. 1, #1

 

 

All contents of this website © Reading From Scratch - All rights reserved

Web site created and maintained by The Design Dept.